Sep 132012
 

iPhone5

It’s the world’s thinnest smartphone. Weighs 20% lighter than the 4S. Looks basically the same. Has support for 4G LTE. Processor and graphics are twice as fast as 4S with the A6 chip inside. 8 MP camera with advanced optics. The connector at the bottom has gotten much smaller.

With-contract pricing starts at $199, with the 4S starting at $99 and the iPhone 4 at $0.

Pre-orders from 14th September. Shipping starts on the 21st.

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Mar 132012
 

How-to: http://i4siri.com/how-to/

Stuff.tv: Available for jailbroken iOS 5 devices – that’s the iPhone 3GS, iPhone 4, iPad, iPad 2 and iPod Touch – i4Siri is something that Apple won’t be happy about, but apparently hasn’t managed to block yet.

Repo: http://i4siri.com/repo

Install iPad 2/iPad Spire: http://idevicedaily.com/repo

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Oct 052011
 

Check out the video below to see what Apple unveiled to the world today, as the next big thing in smartphones.

Now go check out Siri’s homepage.

Oh, and the new iPhone (4S) which also launched today, looks just like the iPhone 4 but has a faster processor and a better camera and comes with iOS 5. That’s it.

BONUS First Siri Commercial:

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Mar 272011
 

Today, Yosion launched the second-generation Apple Peel 520 adapter which is a new wireless device that adds mobile voice and text messaging capabilities to the iPod Touch. The gadget acts as a protective skin that slips over the iPod Touch and includes a battery, dock connector and SIM card holder. Continue reading »

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Mar 022011
 

Ladies and Gentlemen,

The new iPad.

New Features Summary

It’s pretty much the same, except that its not.

Releasing on March 11th, The iPad 2 is faster, has a super sleek new design and front and back facing cameras.

Oh yeah, and it has that astonishingly well design multifunctional magnetic cover.

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Feb 262011
 

It seems that Apple is doing whatever it can to attract more and more people into its ecosystem, and its doing this by making all its products look and feel similar, if not the same.

With the launch of Lion, Mac’s new OS, Apple brings to its computers multi-finger gesture controls that mimick those found in the immensely popular iPad and iPhone. Check out the video below to see for yourself.

What’s new

Launchpad

Launchpad basically replicates the grid of apps you see on the homescreen of the iPhone and iPad. As on those smaller devices, programs can be arranged into folders for easy access. There’s nothing to stop you from just arranging your applications into folders now, of course — the only real difference is that Launchpad does it all for you. And of course, when you install an application, there’s no .dmg files or dragging into the Applications folder. Launchpad is launched with a new grabbing gesture on the keyboard.

AirDrop
AirDrop is a nifty little app to wirelessly zap files through the air to other Macs. Lion detects people using AirDrop nearby, adding photos if they’re in your contacts. To transfer a file, simply drag it to someone’s name. Once accepted, the file nips directly into the person’s Downloads folder.

Full-screen apps

Apps fill the screen, getting rid of the pesky top toolbar. You can switch to another full-screen app or to the desktop by swiping across the trackpad with three fingers.

Mission Control

Mission Control gives you a bird’s-eye view of everything your Mac is running. Thumbnails of all your open apps are arranged together on one screen, with open windows neatly stacked on top of each other. It’s essentially Apple’s existing Exposé feature, but with a smarter layout.

Auto Save and Versions

If you’ve ever lost work due to an unexpected loss of power or a cat walking right across CMD + Q — and who hasn’t? — the auto save will be a welcome feature. If not, documents can be locked to prevent them from auto saving so you can experiment knowing none of your changes need be permanent. You can also revert to the state your document was in when you opened it, if you’re not happy with the changes you’ve made.

If you want to go back to a previous version of your document, Versions gives you a cascading view of the document as it developed. It’s like Time Machine, Apple’s backup software, for individual documents. Versions are saved every hour and you can grab bits from old files into the current version.

Resume
Lion remembers everything you have open so when you restart, it’s all laid out waiting for you. That means you don’t have to open your favourite apps every time you start up, or remember where you saved the document you were working on.

Mail 5

The new version of Mail is another app to take cues from the iPhone, expanding the message on the right and keeping the inbox on the left. A new Mailbox bar gives you one-click access to your favorite folders across the top of the app.

Mail 5 also borrows some ideas from Google Mail, including an increased emphasis on search, and Conversations view. This groups together the emails you’ve exchanged with a particular contact, rather than listing all your messages separately. Unlike Gmail, Mail will keep conversations together even if the subject line changes.

Read more: http://crave.cnet.co.uk/software/mac-os-x-lion-gets-lions-share-of-new-features-from-the-ipad-50002926/#ixzz1F8XyOeWQ

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Feb 242011
 

The biggest news here is not that the new Macbook Pros feature Intel Sandy Bridge Core i5 and i7 processors, AMD Radeon HD 6000M graphics(bye bye, NVIDIA!) or FaceTime HD cameras but the fact that they have Thunderbolt I/O ports.

Thunderbolt (previously known as Light Peak) is the new PC connection technology capable of running at speeds of 10Gbps—more than twice the speed of USB 3.0, and fast enough to transfer a full-length HD movie in less than 30 seconds. Check out the video above to see the Macbook Pro connected using the technology to an external drive and an HD display with a single Thunderbolt cable.

To read more on Thunderbolt: Click here

To see the new line up: Click here

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Feb 182011
 

All work and no play makes Blackberry a dull (office) boy.

It isn’t running Android, webOS, iOS, or even Windows. RIM has brought us the Blackberry PlayBook and it runs a funky realtime operating system called QNX.

Design

To begin things, the PlayBook is a lot smaller than it looks in pictures, and certainly smaller than its primary 7-inch tablet competition, the Galaxy Tab.

It houses one of the fastest processors in the market and a great graphics engine which supports full HD 3D output and unprecedented multi-talsking. If that makes you concerned about the battery life, senior business marketing VP Jeff McDowell has promised that the PlayBook will offer “equal or greater” battery endurance to Apple’s device, while using a smaller cell size. Many people consider that to be among iPad’s foremost strengths, so RIM is surely aiming high by pledging to not only match it, but potentially better it.

The operating system has a lot of similarities to webOS. Some might say too many, considering the primary swipe-to-switch apps feature works and looks just like “cards” in the Palm tablet.

Continue reading : The PlayBook experience

Check out the video below to see some cool 3D content on the Playbook:

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Jan 302011
 

Hello there and welcome to another exciting episode of What You Need 2 Know!

The eStores

Amazon Kindle Store

Apple’s iBooks Store

Barnes & Noble’s Nook Book Store

Google Books

Where can you find the most books?

Amazon’s Kindle and Barnes & Noble’s Nook have the most number with Google books is catching up fast.

As of August 2010, Kindle reportedly had 670,000 books under copyright and an additional 1.8 million in the public domain.

What is the pricing like?

$9.99 for a digital-only copy of popular titles. iBooks and Google Books stores have books priced in the range of $12.99 and $14.99 as well.

Where can you read them?

Kindle, Nook, iPad

Nook, Kindle and the iPad (Credit: Sarah Tew/CNET)

Nook books can be read on Nook e-readers, as well as apps for iPhone, iPad, Android, BlackBerry, Windows, and Mac.

Amazon’s books can be read on Kindle e-readers, plus the iPhone, iPad, Android, BlackBerry, Windows, Mac, and Windows Phone 7.

Google Books are accessible through a web-based reading app as well as iOS and Android apps. Google is said to be in the works to develop its own eReader.

iBooks can only be read on the iPad, iPhone, or iPod touch.

Extras:

Apple iBooks

Google eBooks

Amazon’s Kindle store and the iBook store on the iPad:

Top eBook reading apps:

Andoid: Aldiko, Kobo

iPad: iBooks, Kindle, Nook, Kobo

 

Kobo

 

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